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Enumeration
Enumeration - Image1
Posting Details
Country of origin United States
Created by Matthew Renner
Posted by Matthew Renner
Date first posted February 10, 2014
Game details
Game genre Logic
Game summary The concept of the game is to arrange a set of elements in order. The elements can be panels from a comic, stanzas of a poem, sentences in a paragraph, etc.
# of players 1 to multiple teams
For ages 6 to 12+


Other details


Game Designer / CreatorEdit

  • Created by Matthew Renner

Game SummaryEdit

The concept of the game is to arrange a set of elements in order. The elements can be panels from a comic, stanzas of a poem, sentences in a paragraph, etc. The game is meant to be a teaching tool for various subjects, while also improving logical based thinking and sequencing. The game can be used as a study aid for various subjects.

This game focuses primarily on organization and logical reasoning. Players not only have to arrange the elements in order, but also provide a logical basis for their decisions.

Players / ModeratorsEdit

  • Ages 6-12. 1-6 players per team.
  • Players: The game can be played as individuals or as a team.
  • Moderators: The moderator’s role is to judge arguments for the ordered list.

Game Set-up and ConstructionEdit

  • The game is easily constructed. The lists should be printed off and cut out into their basic elements. The estimated cost is <$1 per person.
  • New lists can be created by the moderators or the players. See Section 7 for examples.

How to Play / Game RulesEdit

Game Workflow:

  • Each team is given a set of lists.
    • The elements in the lists are out of order.
    • Each element is assigned a unique number (typically 0-9) within its list. This number is NOT necessarily in numerical order. This will provide an easy way to determine correctness by the moderators. See Figure 1.
  • Elements in these lists must be arranged in a logical order.
  • Each team must call over a moderator and discuss why their list is in correct order.
    • It is up to the moderator to ask questions about their proposed order and make sure their arguments are logically sound. (e.g. “Why can’t this element go here?” and “Why did you place this one here?”).

Point System:

  • 1 point for each correctly ordered element.
    • Note: lists may have more than one logical order arise due to ambiguity.
  • 0 - 1 points for successfully arguing why a certain order works.
    • 0 for poorly argued, 1 for well argued.
    • Success and points will be determined by the moderators.

Optional rules:

  • Games may be timed.

Templates / DiagramsEdit

Enumeration - Image1

Figure 1. Workflow for the game.

Related Web LinksEdit

  • NA

Other DetailsEdit

Enumeration - Image2

Example 1. This shows a Calvin and Hobbes comic out of order. The answer key is provided in the top right.


Enumeration - Image3

Example 2. This shows a Calvin and Hobbes comic out of order. The answer key is provided at the bottom.


Enumeration - Image4

Example 3. This shows a Garfield comic out of order. The answer key is provided in the bottom right. This one uses no words but still has a clear logical order, which is better suited for younger audiences.


Enumeration - Image5

Example 4. This shows events during the US Revolutionary War, which the player is assumed to be studying.


Enumeration - Image6

Example 5. This shows events during the US Civil War.


Enumeration - Image7

” denotes that these two numbers can be switched and still be correct.


Enumeration - Image8

Example 7. This shows stanzas in the poem, What Fifty Said…, by Robert Frost.

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