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Academic Treasure Hunt
Academic Treasure Hunt - Image1
Posting Details
Country of origin United States
Created by Stanley Korn
Posted by Stanley Korn
Date first posted February 10, 2014
Game details
Game genre Problem solving
Game summary Academic treasure hunt is similar to a conventional treasure hunt, except that the clues require knowledge of various academic subjects in order to locate the next clue or the treasure itself.
# of players From 2 to a whole class of players
For ages 6 to 12+


Other details


Game Designer / CreatorEdit

  • Created by Stanley Korn

Game SummaryEdit

Academic treasure hunt is similar to a conventional treasure hunt, except that the clues require knowledge of various academic subjects in order to locate the next clue or the treasure itself. An example of such a clue is the following: “From your present location, proceed north x meters, where x is calculated as follows: Subtract the year that the Declaration of Independence was signed from the year that the Gettysburg Address was delivered, and divide the result by the number of cups in a gallon. Round off to the nearest tenth of a meter. You will find your next clue under a rock at that location.”

Players / ModeratorsEdit

  • Target age range for this game. 6 - 12 year olds, although teenagers will enjoy playing the game as well.
  • Number of players. At least two; no upper limit.
  • Player dynamics and roles, use of moderators or instructors, etc. The players assume the role of treasure hunters, either as individual players or teams. The moderators/instructors set up the clues and place the “treasure” in advance of play, explain the rules of the game to the players, and are available to answer any questions posed by the latter.

Game Set-up and ConstructionEdit

Detailed step-by-step instructions on how to set-up and/or construct the game.

  • The only materials needed are the clues, which can be written/typed on paper, and the prize.

Details on materials needed including alternatives if possible.

  • Depending on the level of technology available, the contestants can construct their word sequences either using pen/pencil and paper, on whiteboards, or using computers. It should be emphasized that whiteboards and computers are not necessary to play the game; their only purpose is to enable the spectators (if any) to follow the progress of the contestants in building their word sequences.

Estimated cost to get the game up and running and to operate on an ongoing basis.

  • The main costs would be the cost of renting the location for the treasure hunt and hiring the coordinator(s) of the treasure hunt. If the treasure hunt is conducted as a classroom exercise, then these would not be additional costs, since the cost of the teachers and the school facilities are already paid for. The prize itself could be something of nominal value.

How to Play / Game RulesEdit

Academic treasure hunt is similar to a conventional treasure hunt, except that the clues require knowledge of various academic subjects in order to locate the next clue or the treasure itself. An example of such a clue is the following: “From your present location, proceed north x meters, where x is calculated as follows: Subtract the year that the Declaration of Independence was signed from the year that the Gettysburg Address was delivered, and divide the result by the number of cups in a gallon. Round off to the nearest tenth of a meter. You will find your next clue under a rock at that location.”

An academic treasure hunt can be conducted in a classroom setting in order to motivate the students to learn their subject material. While the game lends itself to being played by teams, it can be played by individual players as well. The setting of the treasure hunt can be a classroom, a large room such as a gymnasium, a playground, or a park.

Prior to the beginning of the treasure hunt, the clues and the treasure are placed in the appropriate positions in the location at which the treasure hunt is to be conducted. The “treasure” placed on location may be either a physical object (the prize) or a note describing the prize. The person or persons coordinating the treasure hunt need to be knowledgeable on the rules, so that they can explain the rules to the players (i.e., the treasure hunters).

At the beginning of the treasure hunt, the coordinator explains the rules and provides each team or individual player with a map of the area. The coordinator decides what resources are to be available to the players (e.g., books or access to the internet). Optionally, the coordinator (e.g., teacher) may divide the players (e.g., students) into teams. The players are then assembled at the starting location. If there are no further questions, then the players are given the “go” signal and begin the treasure hunt. The first player or team to locate the treasure is the winner, and receives the prize.

Templates / DiagramsEdit

  • NA

Related Web LinksEdit

  • NA

Other DetailsEdit

Academic treasure hunt is an excellent way to motivate students to learn their subject material.

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